Marriage And Money

Written by Dr. Dorree Lynn


Continued from page 1

Bill and Nadine originally had been attracted to each other byrepparttar very differences that they now found impossible to live with. In fact, they were like opposite pairs of bookends. If you put them together,repparttar 126297 two halves made a whole. I am sure some sensible part of each of them understood that alone they were unbalanced and together they could make a good team. That is, if they didnít kill each other first.

Therapy helped them to understand their different histories and expectations and over time, each one slowly moved slightly towardsrepparttar 126298 center. Their disastrous fights lessened and they could begin to remember why they fell in love inrepparttar 126299 first place. It took courage for each of them to learn how to listen torepparttar 126300 other and to give up pieces of their own dearly cherished beliefs. Byrepparttar 126301 time they left therapy, money was rarely an issue between them.

But, I wonder what would have happened to this marriage if they hadnít received help? I doubt that it would have lasted and it would have gonerepparttar 126302 way of so many marriages where each partner findsrepparttar 126303 otherís attitude and ways of managing money totally incomprehensible.

Money is both a metaphor and a reality. Talking openly and communicating about money becomes another way for you and your spouse to get to know each other. Attitudes towards money range fromrepparttar 126304 penurial torepparttar 126305 extravagant. There is no reason to run torepparttar 126306 divorce court just because you and your spouse have different ways of managing your finances.

Attitudes and relationships towards finances are unique to you and reveal a good deal about who you are and how you operate. Dollars and cents arerepparttar 126307 interface or unit of exchange between you and society and learning where you stand alongrepparttar 126308 continuum, from prudent to expansive, can help you learn more about how you negotiate through life. The more you understand about yourself and your spouse when money matters,repparttar 126309 better chance you have of working out a successful marriage. Try it.

Life is too hard to do alone,

Dr. D.

Dorree Lynn, PH.D.



Dr. Dorree Lynn is co-founder of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Psychotherapy and a practicing clinician in New York and Washington, DC. Dr. Lynn served on the executive board of the American Academy of Psychotherapists and she is on the editorial board of their publication, Voices. She is also a regular columnist for the Washington, DC newspaper, The Georgetowner. Dr. Lynn is a noted speaker and well known on the lecture circuit.


Holiday Blues

Written by Dr. Dorree Lynn


Continued from page 1

3. Feelings of worthlessness and low self esteem.

4. Fatigue and low energy, unable to get out of bed.

5. Recurring thoughts of death or suicide.

6. Difficulty concentrating for an extended period of time.

7. Sudden weight gain or loss in greater than usual proportions. (Not justrepparttar usual holiday few extra pounds.)

8. Sleep disturbances such as: difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep or sleeping too much.

9. Continued feelings of helplessness or hopelessness.

10. "Out of character" irritability, impatience or anger.

11. Loss of interest in sex.

12. Loss of interest in your usual daily fun activities.

What To Do:

1. Ask for help.

2. Get help.

3. Give help.

4. Userepparttar 126296 help available.

5. Don't stay alone. Make sure you seek out others.

6. Don't try to hide your condition from loved ones. Those who care can help you getrepparttar 126297 help you need.

7. Use all available resources. Where To Go:

1. Ask a family member or friend to help you find a referral to a therapist.

2. Ask you physician for a referral to a mental health professional.

3. If your physician prescribes temporary medication, take it.

4. If you use an integrative health practitioner such as an acupuncturist, call them.

5. If you have successfully used alternative medications inrepparttar 126298 past such as Melatonin or St. John's Wort, consider trying them again.

6. Contact your local directory, crisis center, or hot line.

7. Callrepparttar 126299 national crisis hot line: 1-888-363-2287

8. Contact Depression U.S.A., Rockville, MD, 20857

9. Contact your local divorce group, parent's without partners or your religious affiliation.

10. Send your questions to me at www.SaneCrazy.com.

As I have been telling others on nationally syndicated radio and TV, this is a particularly vulnerable time of year. The media, society and those around you tell you to be happy. Instead, you may be missing your family or your current situation is different from what you hoped it would be. Perhaps you have wonderful or dreadful childhood memories of this season that have resurfaced, or your expectations are unrealistic and you don't understand why? Maybe Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) has hit you bad and some light is required?

Whateverrepparttar 126300 reason for your blues this season, next year can be better. Get through this difficult time using allrepparttar 126301 help available. The New Year and new opportunity starts soon.

Life is too hard to do alone,

Dr. D.

Dorree Lynn, PH.D.



Dr. Dorree Lynn is co-founder of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Psychotherapy and a practicing clinician in New York and Washington, DC. Dr. Lynn served on the executive board of the American Academy of Psychotherapists and she is on the editorial board of their publication, Voices. She is also a regular columnist for the Washington, DC newspaper, The Georgetowner. Dr. Lynn is a noted speaker and well known on the lecture circuit.


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