Delivering Your Email Newsletter

Written by Robert F. Abbott


Continued from page 1

Of course, itís much easier to have someone else dorepparttar mailing for you, and thatís where weíre going next, since few of us haverepparttar 139147 expertise or time to do it ourselves.

Full service providers take care of all, or almost allrepparttar 139148 work for you. You fill in a few forms, make a few choices, and then they take over and dorepparttar 139149 rest. Those duties include adding and removing names, sendingrepparttar 139150 mail, and handling mail that canít be delivered (expect as many as 5% of messages to Ďbounceí back after each mailing, once your list begins to grow).

So, if youíve decided to use a full service provider, you next have to decide whether to use a free service or pay-for-service provider. Again, free generally works well when your list is small, and grows more problematic asrepparttar 139151 number of subscribers increases.

Free services offer many ofrepparttar 139152 same services asrepparttar 139153 commercial services, but donít charge a fee. The catch? They place an ad in your e-mail newsletter. If you sell advertisingrepparttar 139154 free service takes away a revenue spot. Or they restrictrepparttar 139155 number of subscribers orrepparttar 139156 number of mailouts. Services Iíve used include Topica, MailerMailer, and atrepparttar 139157 moment, I use ResponseBot. Again, you can find other services by using a search engine or directory.

One ofrepparttar 139158 great advantages of using free services isrepparttar 139159 opportunity to try out different services before making a commitment. Test drive each one for a few issues to find out whether or not you like it, then make your choice.

Summing up, finding your way throughrepparttar 139160 delivery choices can be a big job. But, be grateful forrepparttar 139161 choices, and use free versions to find out which works best for you.

Robert F. Abbott,repparttar 139162 author of A Managerís Guide to Newsletters: Communicating for Results, writes and publishes Abbottís Communication Letter. Read more articles about Internet communication, as well as email and printed newsletters at: http://www.communication-newsletter.com/ic.html

Robert F. Abbott, the author of A Managerís Guide to Newsletters: Communicating for Results, writes and publishes Abbottís Communication Letter. Read more articles about Internet communication, as well as email and printed newsletters at: http://www.communication-newsletter.com/ic.html


Managing Internet Addresses in Your Email Newsletter

Written by Robert F. Abbott


Continued from page 1

Turning to email addresses, putrepparttar word ďmailtoĒ plus a colon beforerepparttar 139006 address. For example, mailto:info@yoururl.com rather than simply info@yoururl.com . When readers click on an address with a mailto: before it, a new message automatically pops up in their email programs, with your address already inrepparttar 139007 TO field. That also hasrepparttar 139008 advantage of reducing errors in transcribing or copying and pasting.

Also, be wary of URLs that split atrepparttar 139009 end of a line. Whilerepparttar 139010 URL may not split in your email program, it may do so inrepparttar 139011 subscriberís. I usually try to set up so URLs fall atrepparttar 139012 end of a paragraph, and then put in a return before them, so they are on a line by themselves.

Finally, after youíve emailed a test copy of your newsletter to yourself, testrepparttar 139013 links onrepparttar 139014 copy that arrived at your IN box. Click each link to ensure your readers can get to your page or to their email program with just one click. No copying,. no pasting, no transcribing - just one click.

In summary, by taking these few simple steps, you can make your newsletter more readable. And if itís more readable, itís more likely to getrepparttar 139015 response you want.

Robert F. Abbott, the author of A Managerís Guide to Newsletters: Communicating for Results, writes and publishes Abbottís Communication Letter. Read more articles about Internet communication, as well as email and printed newsletters at: http://www.communication-newsletter.com/ic.html


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