Possibilities

Written by Lynn Cutts


Do you ever conceive of an idea, startrepparttar project, and then get distracted with a new one? Do you have hundreds of great ideas that never get finished? Do you jump around from one project to another?

You're in good company. It's a common pattern among highly creative and intelligent people. I call it "leap frogging," and it's what happens when people prefer having ideas to carrying them to completion.

There are many reasons we leap frog. One is that it's more fun to think and play with new "toys" than it is to work with old ones. Another is that any project has its own rhythm, which includes lulls, slumps, and brick walls. It's easier to start a new project that hasn't hit a wall, lull or slump than it is to work throughrepparttar 136271 wall, lull or slump ofrepparttar 136272 current project. And a third, which is more common than a lot of us think, is a fear that we'll never have time to get allrepparttar 136273 stuff done in our lifetimes, or even more significantly, that we'll forget this great new idea and all it's nuances byrepparttar 136274 time we've finishedrepparttar 136275 current project. After all, it does happen - allrepparttar 136276 time.

There are many time management approaches to deal withrepparttar 136277 first two reasons, but few addressrepparttar 136278 third issue: what if I forget? After all, when we first come up with an idea, we are in love with it. We don't want it to fall byrepparttar 136279 wayside. (Even though we may not feel that way about six weeks into it, when something new and more interesting comes along.) So we allow ourselves to get distracted and jump into that shiny, new project.

Here's a solution. Set up a Possibilities list. Arrange four files, or sections in a three-ring notebook, or whatever system works for you. Label these, "This Year, Next Year, Some Year, and Maybe." (If this phrase rings a bell, it's adapted from an old jump rope rhyme.) Then when you get your next great idea, scribble no more than one page about that new idea, and then file it, according to when you WANT to get to it, instead of jumping on it right away.

A Secret and A Formula For Success

Written by Ginny Dye


Are you looking forrepparttar secret or magical formula for success? Do you think itís a well-guarded, password-protected valuable locked away in some private vault? Good news! In this article I openrepparttar 136217 vault wide.

Here's The Secret...

The secret to success is having a strong vision andrepparttar 136218 will to overcome whatever obstacles get in your way. Not what you wanted to hear? Read on.

When Amadeo Peter Giannini (better known as A.P.) was only 7, his father died in a fight over one dollar. Times got real hard. Eventually A.P.ís mother married a man inrepparttar 136219 produce business. At age 14 A.P. quit school to work with his stepfather. By 19 he was a partner in their thriving enterprise. It was here that A.P. built his reputation for integrity and honesty. At 31 years of age he had allrepparttar 136220 money he needed or wanted, and announced his retirement.

At 32, A.Pís real career started when he was asked to joinrepparttar 136221 board ofrepparttar 136222 Columbus Savings & Loan society. It wasn't long before A.P found himself at odds withrepparttar 136223 other directors. He wantedrepparttar 136224 bank to loan money to hard-working immigrants, but at that time banks catered only to business men andrepparttar 136225 wealthy. His ideas of loaning money torepparttar 136226 working class were scoffed at.

But A.P. hadrepparttar 136227 vision andrepparttar 136228 will. He raised $150,000, and bought a converted saloon acrossrepparttar 136229 street fromrepparttar 136230 Columbus S&L. A. P. keptrepparttar 136231 bartender on as an assistant teller, and openedrepparttar 136232 Bank of Italy. It was considered improper and uncouth, but A.P. began ringing doorbells and talking to everyone he could about his bank. He advertised. He keptrepparttar 136233 bank open longer hours and on weekends to fit into working people's schedules. Business boomed.

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