Parents --- Your Children's Report Card May Be Rigged

Written by Joel Turtel

Underrepparttar "No Child Left Behind Act," public schools whose students consistently fail standardized tests can be shut down. To protect their jobs, teachers and principals are now under intense pressure to cheat — to fudge test scores and report cards to fool parents and school administrators.

Myron Lieberman, author and former high-school teacher, listed some ofrepparttar 144311 ways public schools can “cheat” in his book “Public Education: an Autopsy”:

1. Poor students were excluded or discouraged from takingrepparttar 144312 tests

2. Teachers assigned tests as homework or taught test items in class

3. Test security was minimal or even nonexistent

4. Students were allowed more time than prescribed by test regulations

5. Unrealistic, highly improbable improvements from test to test were not audited or investigated

6. Teachers and administrators were not punished for flagrant violations of test procedures

7. Test results were reported in ways that exaggerated achievement levels

In December 1999, a special investigation of New York City schools revealed that two principals and dozens of teachers and assistant teachers were helping students cheat on standardized math and reading tests.

Andrew J. Coulson, in his brilliant book, "Market Education: The Unknown History," sites an example of how public schools deliberately lie to parents about their children’s academic abilities:

“Consistently greeted by A’s and B’s on their children’s report cards,repparttar 144313 parents of Zavala Elementary School had been lulled into complacency, believing that bothrepparttar 144314 school and its students were performing well. In fact, Zavala was one ofrepparttar 144315 worst schools inrepparttar 144316 district, and its students ranked nearrepparttar 144317 bottom on statewide standardized tests. When a new principal took overrepparttar 144318 helm and requested thatrepparttar 144319 statewide scores be read out at a PTA meeting, parents were dismayed by their children’s abysmal showing, and furious with teachers and school officials for misleading them with inflated grades.”

Ten Tips To Stimulate Your Newborn's Senses

Written by Amy Faddem

A number of scientific studies have shownrepparttar way a baby uses her senses inrepparttar 144310 early months of life is crucial to future development. A baby, whose senses are stimulated develop a sharper memory, inquisitiveness and a better concentration. Besides, babies who are stimulated attain developmental milestones earlier have superior muscle coordination, and a safer and sounder personality.

Here a few effective tips that you will find particularly useful to stimulate your newborn's senses and development, right fromrepparttar 144311 beginning.

1. Make your baby touch fabrics of different textures, e.g., smooth, rough, cushiony. This would help develop her sense of touch.

2. Hold up bright colored blocks or other colorful objects 10 to 12 inches away from your baby's eyes. When she focuses, try moving it left and right, up and down and then in circles. Doing so will improve her sight.

3. Provide your baby high-contrast toys such as mobiles with black-and-white or primary color patterns, or hang them inrepparttar 144312 crib. These would help stimulaterepparttar 144313 parts ofrepparttar 144314 brain controlling vision.

4. Play “Pat-a-Cake” while you hold your baby and gently move her hands.

5. Sing to your baby. Changerepparttar 144315 pitch of your voice from high to low. Doing so will help hold her attention. Babies generally respond well to mom’s singing and will often help her to settle.

6. Talk to your baby whenever you are with her; describe her all that you are doing to her: bathing, changing, feeding. “Are you enjoying your bath? Do you like your new soap? Here comes a new diaper for you.” This type of descriptive talking will not only liked by your baby but is alsorepparttar 144316 base of communication betweenrepparttar 144317 two of you. The more you talk to your babyrepparttar 144318 more she is able to learn.

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