Ocular Nutrition And Eye Health

Written by David Buster


Understanding ocular nutrition and eye health can be one ofrepparttar ways to support your vision. As early as age 30, our eyes and vision can begin to deteriorate. Wind, dust, chlorine fumes, automobile fumes, smoking, freezing temperatures and physical injury are examples of threats to healthy eyes and good vision. Long hours spent at a computer screen andrepparttar 150240 vibration from driving have a cumulative negative impact on eye health over time.

Healthy vision is related torepparttar 150241 health ofrepparttar 150242 individual parts ofrepparttar 150243 eye repparttar 150244 cornea, iris, macula, lens, optic nerve, pupil, retina andrepparttar 150245 vitreous humor. And making good ocular nutrition and eye health food choices are one ofrepparttar 150246 ways that good vision can be supported. Information provided byrepparttar 150247 U.S. National Eye Institute andrepparttar 150248 results of other ocular nutrition and eye health studies have shown that using nutrition to improve and support eye health definitely happens.

Here are foods that are known to support and improve eye health:

Collard greens, kale and spinach - studies on ocular nutrition and eye health show that eating foods rich in carotenoids is associated with reduced risk of developing age-related macular degeneration. Foods rich in carotenoids are leafy green vegetables such as spinach, collard greens and kale. Macular eye nutrition becomes increasingly important as we get older.

Green vegetables and corn - another study on ocular nutrition and eye health has shown a reduced risk of developing cataracts for persons having diets higher in lutein and zeaxanthin. Foods high in these two carotenoids include broccoli, collard greens, corn, green peas, kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, turnip greens and zucchini. Lutein is also found in egg yolks. Persons with diets high in lutein and zeaxanthin were also less likely to need cataract surgery. In another study done on persons ages 40-59, those with diets high in lutein and zeaxanthin experienced a reduced risk of developing adult macular degeneration.

L-tyrosine and Your Health

Written by Josie Anderson


L-tyrosine is a protein thatrepparttar body produces from phenylamine, thus making it a non-essential amino acid. L-tyrosine is available from natural foo sources including: - cottage cheese - yogurt - cheese - milk - bananas - lima beans - turkey - peanuts - avocados - almonds - pumpkin seeds - sesame seeds

L-Tyrosine supplementation is especially needed among hard training athletes and obese or those significantly overweight.

Low levels of l-tyrosine have bee associated with low body temperature, low blood pressure, underactive thyroid, and depression.

L-tyrosine has many important roles inrepparttar 150239 body. Bodybuilders favor it because l-tyrosine helps alleviate stress and fatigue that comes from intense training, retain muscular protein, and increase energy levels. L-tyrosine helps with stamina enameling athletes to workout for longer periods of time.

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