Drinking and Driving - Will Your Child Become a Statistic?

Written by C. Bailey-Lloyd/LadyCamelot


Drinking and Driving - Will Your Child Become a Statistic? by C. Bailey-Lloyd

Just two days ago, another 15-year old child was added torepparttar overwhelming statistics of drunk-driving, related deaths. One minute, he's full of vitality and attending our local high school,repparttar 132337 next his unsuspecting parents are identifying him in a local morgue. The harsh reality of this brutal scenerio is sometimes very difficult to comprehend.

"Where did I go wrong?" "Didn't I talk enough with my child?" "I thought he knew better..." "I assumed he was just at a friend's house..."

These, and various other queries, are all similar questions parents tend to ask themselves after an incident or accident involving DUI or DWI (Driving Underrepparttar 132338 Influence, or Driving While Intoxicated).

According to MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving), NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) andrepparttar 132339 NIAAA (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism),

* Parents' drinking behavior and favorable attitudes about drinking have been positively associated with adolescents' initiating and continued drinking. (NIAAA, 1997)

* Youth who drink before age 15 are four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than those who begin drinking at age 21. (NIAAA, 1997)

* Underage drinkers are responsible for between 10 and 20 percent of all alcohol consumed inrepparttar 132340 United States. (NAS, 2003)

* In 2002, 29 percent of 15 to 20-year-old drivers killed in motor vehicle crashes had been drinking. Twenty-four percent were intoxicated.

* Research continues to show that young drivers between 15 and 20 years old are more often involved in alcohol-related crashes than any other comparable age group. Alcohol-crash involvement rates, share ofrepparttar 132341 alcohol-crash problem and alcohol-crash risk all reach their peaks with young drivers, withrepparttar 132342 peaks for fatal crashes occurring at age 21. (NHTSA, 2001)

* Based onrepparttar 132343 latest mortality data available, motor vehicle crashes arerepparttar 132344 leading cause of death for people from 15 to 20 years old. (NHTSA, 2003)

Of course, statistically speaking,repparttar 132345 list could go on and on. All too often, we as parents get caught up inrepparttar 132346 daily grind of work, household chores, and other engagements. Sometimes we forget how to prioritize our committments. Ironically though, it is our teenage children who suffer from our own strategies on making their lives more comfortable.

John J. Berrio wrote a shocking but enlightening, infamous piece on teenage vehicular-related death based on a friend's son:

Only 17

Agony claws my mind. I am a statistic. When I first got here I felt very much alone. I was overwhelmed by grief, and I expected to find sympathy.

I found no sympathy. I saw only thousands of others whose bodies were as badly mangled as mine. I was given a number and placed in a category. The category was called "Traffic Fatalities."

The day I died was an ordinary school day. How I wish I had takenrepparttar 132347 bus! But I was too cool forrepparttar 132348 bus. I remember how I wheedledrepparttar 132349 car out of Mom. "Special favor," I pleaded. "Allrepparttar 132350 kids drive." Whenrepparttar 132351 2:50 p.m. bell rang, I threw my books inrepparttar 132352 locker ... free until tomorrow morning! I ran torepparttar 132353 parking lot, excited atrepparttar 132354 thought of driving a car and being my own boss.

It doesn't matter howrepparttar 132355 accident happened. I was goofing off -- going too fast, taking crazy chances. But I was enjoying my freedom and having fun. The last thing I remember was passing an old lady who seemed to be going awfully slow. I heard a crash and felt a terrific jolt. Glass and steel flew everywhere. My whole body seemed to be turning inside out. I heard myself scream.

Suddenly, I awakened. It was very quiet. A police officer was standing over me. I saw a doctor. My body was mangled. I was saturated with blood. Pieces of jagged glass were sticking out all over. Strange that I couldn't feel anything. Hey, don't pull that sheet over my head. I can't be dead. I'm only 17. I've got a date tonight. I'm supposed to have a wonderful life ahead of me. I haven't lived yet. I can't be dead.

Later I was placed in a drawer. My folks came to identify me. Why did they have to see me like this? Why did I have to look at Mom's eyes when she facedrepparttar 132356 most terrible ordeal of her life? Dad suddenly looked very old. He toldrepparttar 132357 man in charge, "Yes, he's our son."

The funeral was weird. I saw all my relatives and friends walk towardrepparttar 132358 casket. They looked at me withrepparttar 132359 saddest eyes I've ever seen. Some of my buddies were crying. A few ofrepparttar 132360 girls touched my hand and sobbed as they walked by.

Please, somebody -- wake me up! Get me out of here. I can't bear to see Mom and Dad in such pain. My grandparents are so weak from grief they can barely walk. My brother and sister are like zombies. They move like robots. In a daze. Everybody. No one can believe this. I can't believe it, either.

Please, don't bury me! I'm not dead! I have a lot of living to do! I want to laugh and run again. I want to sing and dance. Please don't put me inrepparttar 132361 ground! I promise if you give me just one more chance, God, I'll berepparttar 132362 most careful driver inrepparttar 132363 whole world. All I want is one more chance. Please, God, I'm only 17.

By, John Berrio _____________________________________________________________

This well-known story has been circulated acrossrepparttar 132364 globe. Also known as "Dead at 17," and "Please God, I'm Only 17" is a stanching piece that has hailed teenagers and parents alike.

As a ritual, this literature is ground intorepparttar 132365 core of my thought processes. Not too long ago, we were all faced with enticements of "...let's go to that party...", "...come, on...it's only a few miles uprepparttar 132366 road. He's not drunk...he's only had a few beers...." "Sure she can drive...she's done this a million times before..." And all too often, teenagers fall to peer pressure because they want to be cool, popular or part ofrepparttar 132367 "in-crowd." Sadly, many do become victims of psychological pressure tactics.

TAX is killing the American dream

Written by United Citizens of America


Some say that our politicians are inrepparttar same neighborhood in their thoughts as our founding fathers. I don't know if I would go so far as say, "they are inrepparttar 132334 same neighborhood". However, they are still Americans - which is a very good thing. But, they are far too removed fromrepparttar 132335 lives ofrepparttar 132336 ordinary person to be considered neighborly.

You have to remember thatrepparttar 132337 primary reason our nationís founders went to war was due to increasing monarchy taxation. Our founders felt thatrepparttar 132338 tax burden was stifling colonial-mans ability to make a better life for themselves and their families. Their thinking was - why should they bust their backs to makerepparttar 132339 monarchy wealthier? The original taxation guidelines that our founders initiated for our nation states:

"No captivation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in proportion torepparttar 132340 census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken". (Meaning that they cannot tax citizens without a citizen census being taken first.)

This law held for 201 years until our modern politicians felt they knew better than our founders did. Coincidently, it is roughly around this timeframe that government spending sharply increased along with our nationís debt. In 1977, our modern day politicians institutedrepparttar 132341 following amendment.

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