Understanding the Three Levels of Obedience for a Three-Year-Old

Written by Maren Schmidt


Continued from page 1

So we teach and re-teach asrepparttar child moves between levels one and two, and then one beautiful day,repparttar 149873 child is working atrepparttar 149874 third level of obedience.

Let's take an example of making a bed. Atrepparttar 149875 first level,repparttar 149876 child is shown how to make a bed. The child shows willingness by trying to makerepparttar 149877 bedrepparttar 149878 next morning. The bedspread is hanging too low on one side and there are lumps. Being friendly with error,repparttar 149879 adult simply states, "You maderepparttar 149880 bed by yourself."

The next dayrepparttar 149881 child forgets to makerepparttar 149882 bed. The adult gives another demonstration, wordlessly looking at both sides ofrepparttar 149883 spread to make sure they are even. The next dayrepparttar 149884 child makesrepparttar 149885 bed. The fourth dayrepparttar 149886 child forgets to makerepparttar 149887 bed. The adult remindsrepparttar 149888 child, andrepparttar 149889 child goes cheerfully to makerepparttar 149890 bed. Ifrepparttar 149891 child protests,repparttar 149892 adult simply smiles and says "Let's do it together," knowing thatrepparttar 149893 child may have forgotten how to do it.

After a few daysrepparttar 149894 child can makerepparttar 149895 bed with just a verbal reminder. At some point, weeks, months or years,repparttar 149896 child will reachrepparttar 149897 third level and makerepparttar 149898 bed perfectly without any reminders. (Parents of teenagers are allowed to roll their eyes if still waiting on this third level of obedience.)

All of us learn faster and better in a trusting relationship. Trust is developed by offering assistance in a clear, concise and kind manner. The adult doesn't askrepparttar 149899 child to do something that is too difficult or belittlerepparttar 149900 child for not being able to do it. The adult remembers that it takes many reteachings to get torepparttar 149901 second level of obedience and much practice to arrive atrepparttar 149902 third level.

The adult needs to observerepparttar 149903 child's will, skill and experience levels before asking them to do something. We can offer assistance torepparttar 149904 child, keeping in mind "any unnecessary help is a hindrance."

Forrepparttar 149905 three- to six-year-old, these levels of skill, experience and obedience are changing daily. As adults, we need to remain "friendly with error" asrepparttar 149906 child's experience and memory propel them torepparttar 149907 third level of obedience, an obedience built on a relationship of trust and mutual respect.

Kids Talk is a column dealing with early childhood development issues written by Maren Stark Schmidt. Mrs. Schmidt founded a Montessori school and holds a Masters of Education from Loyola College in Maryland.

She has over 20 years experience working with young children and holds teaching credentials fromrepparttar 149908 Association Montessori Internationale.

Ask your local newspaper to carry Kids Talk. Call, write or e-mail your local newspaper editor and recommend Kids Talk.

Would you like to send Kids Talk to friends and family or receive Kids Talk e-mail updates in your own inbox? Sign up for FREE here: http://www.shininglightreading.com/enews.html

Maren Schmidt is Creative Director for a video-based reading series for children ages three to six, The Shining Light Reading Series. Visit http://www.shininglightreading.com for more information. Sign up for FREE here: http://www.shininglightreading.com/enews.html


Taming the Television Monster

Written by Maren Schmidt


Continued from page 1

If your child has a television or computer in his or her room, consider removing it permanently. You can console them by saying, "Too bad. Why don't you get something from your activity shelf?" They might cry and complain, but remain cheerful and direct them to their activity center.

To optimize their learning, children need to use their hands and heads together. Granted, television can give good information, but watching it robs our children of hands-on activities that develop important skills such as drawing, building, sewing and reading, to only name a few.

Using an activity center, they will become active, imaginative learners instead of passive learners. I challenge you to turn off your television for one week. It takes a bit of planning, but I think you will discover something wonderful.

Robin marveled atrepparttar changes in her children, and they went more than a month withoutrepparttar 149872 television. Robin told me, "After a week, they didn't even ask about it." It could happen to you. Happy parenting!

(Helpful hint for world peace: If Dad has to watchrepparttar 149873 game, ask a friend to have him over.)

Favorite Salt Dough Recipe 1-cup flour 1/2-cup salt 1-cup water 1-tablespoon cream of tartar 1-tablespoon oil

Stir and cookrepparttar 149874 ingredients in a saucepan until rubbery. Knead slightly. Food coloring may be added. Cool and store in a plastic container.

Kids Talk is a column dealing with early childhood development issues written by Maren Stark Schmidt. Mrs. Schmidt founded a Montessori school and holds a Masters of Education from Loyola College in Maryland.

She has over 20 years experience working with young children and holds teaching credentials fromrepparttar 149875 Association Montessori Internationale. She is also Creative Director for a video-based reading series for children ages three to six, The Shining Light Reading Series. Contact her via e-mail at maren@shininglightreading.com.

Visit http://www.shininglightreading.com for more information.

Ask your local newspaper to carry Kids Talk. Call, write or e-mail your local newspaper editor and recommend Kids Talk.

Would you like to send Kids Talk to friends and family or receive Kids Talk e-mail updates in your own inbox? Sign up for FREE here: http://www.shininglightreading.com/enews.html

©KIDS TALKô 925 N.W. Hoyt #532 Portland, OR 97209 503.274.9788 maren@comcast.net

Maren Schmidt is Creative Director for a video-based reading series for children ages three to six, The Shining Light Reading Series. Contact her via e-mail at maren@shininglightreading.com.

Visit http://www.shininglightreading.com for more information.

Sign up for Kids Talk News for FREE here: http://www.shininglightreading.com/enews.html


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