Your Rights Under The Equal Credit Opportunity Act

Written by www.creditandyou.com


Continued from page 1

Ask about your marital status if youíre applying for a separate, unsecured account. A creditor may ask you to provide this information if you live in community property states, Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Washington. A creditor in any state may ask for this information if you apply for a joint credit account or one secured by property.

Request information about your spouse, except when your spouse is applying for credit with you. Note: your spouse will be allowed to userepparttar credit account. You are relying on your spouseís income or on alimony or child support income from a former spouse; or if you reside in a community property state.

Inquire about your plans for having or raising children.

Ask if you receive alimony, child support, or separate maintenance payments, unless youíre first told that, you donít have to provide this information if you wonít rely on these payments to get credit. A creditor may ask if you have to pay alimony, child support, or separate maintenance payments.

A Special Note To Women

A good credit history, a record of how you paid past bills often is necessary to get credit. Unfortunately, this hurts many married, separated, divorced, and widowed women. There are two common reasons women donít have credit histories in their own names: they lost their credit histories when they married and changed their names, or creditors reported accounts shared by married couples inrepparttar 147261 husbandís name only.

If youíre married, divorced, separated, or widowed, contactrepparttar 147262 credit bureaus to make sure all relevant information is in a file under your own name.

To find additional rights you have, what a creditor may not do: when deciding to give you credit or evaluating your income for credit and what to do if you suspect discrimination visit: http://www.creditandyou.com/yourcreditrights.html itís a free information website!

To find additional rights you have, what a creditor may not do: when deciding to give you credit or evaluating your income for credit and what to do if you suspect discrimination visit: http://www.creditandyou.com/yourcreditrights.html itís a free information website!


How To Safely Offer Seller Financing

Written by Steve Gillman


Continued from page 1

5. Considerrepparttar whole picture. Suppose a bank will loan 90%, and is okay with you taking back a $5,000 second mortgage, allowingrepparttar 147260 buyer to get in with what cash he has. If you're getting $6,000 more than you expected by accomodatingrepparttar 147261 buyer's needs, where'srepparttar 147262 loss? You're okay if he never paysrepparttar 147263 $5,000, right?

6. Talk to a lawyer. Maybe in your area it takes two years to get a foreclosure on a mortgage throughrepparttar 147264 courts, and only six months to foreclose on a "contract for sale." Knowing these things can help you sell inrepparttar 147265 safest way.

Offering seller financing makes it easier to sell, and to get a higher price. Just be safe about it. Have a real estate lawyer review your paperwork, and userepparttar 147266 tips here.

Steve Gillman has invested real estate for years. To learn more, and to see a photo of a beautiful house he and his wife bought for $17,500, visit http://www.HousesUnderFiftyThousand.com


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