Tips on Dealing With the Media

Written by Ned Steele


Continued from page 1

Occasionally, a reporter will offer to show yourepparttar story before it runs. Thatís different. Itís usually because they want to check facts, or ensure that they have quoted you correctly.

Always say yes if they initiate this offer. Even if you have 12 meetings tomorrow morning, and are undergoing surgery after lunch. This is a chance to make yourself sound as knowledgeable and intelligent as possible torepparttar 144458 thousands of potential clients that will readrepparttar 144459 article.

Ned Steele works with people in professional services who want to build their practice and accelerate their growth. The president of Ned Steele's MediaImpact, he is the author of 102 Publicity Tips To Grow a Business or Practice. To learn more visit http://www.MediaImpact.biz or call 212-243-8383.


Financial Planners, Want Free Marketing and Publicity? The Key is Understanding the Media

Written by Ned Steele


Continued from page 1

Information: Dr. Jones is a leading authority on certain rare infectious diseases, lecturing and writing onrepparttar subject inrepparttar 144457 worldís most distinguished medical journals and colloquia.

News: The Governor of Dr. Jonesís state contracts one of those diseases, and uncertainty over his ability to remain in office swirls. Dr. Jones does not treatrepparttar 144458 Governor, so he cautions that he cannot comment onrepparttar 144459 specifics of this case. But calmly and objectively, he explains to reporters in lay termsrepparttar 144460 general facts about this kind of illness, pointing out that 90% of people with it recover promptly with treatment once diagnosed.

Information: broad, deep, and evergreen.

News: narrower, shallower, but timely and topical.

The knowledge within it is no less true, real, or important. Itís just been distilled into bite-sized bits that fitrepparttar 144461 space inrepparttar 144462 paper,repparttar 144463 time onrepparttar 144464 show, orrepparttar 144465 audienceís attention span. Distilling that information into news, and then assembling it into appealing packages called stories, is essentially whatrepparttar 144466 news media do.

So donít be like one of those characters in an Alfred Hitchcock movie Ė getting in trouble because you know too much. Instead, learn to slice and dice your topic into many narrower, manageable offerings.

Ned Steele works with people in professional services who want to build their practice and accelerate their growth. The president of Ned Steele's MediaImpact, he is the author of 102 Publicity Tips To Grow a Business or Practice. To learn more visit http://www.MediaImpact.biz or call 212-243-8383.


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