The Depressive Narcissist

Written by Sam Vaknin


Continued from page 1

IV. Grandiosity Gap Dysphoria

The narcissist's firmly, though counterfactually, perceives himself as omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent, brilliant, accomplished, irresistible, immune, and invincible. Any data torepparttar contrary is usually filtered, altered, or discarded altogether. Still, sometimes reality intrudes and creates a Grandiosity Gap. The narcissist is forced to face his mortality, limitations, ignorance, and relative inferiority. He sulks and sinks into an incapacitating but short-lived dysphoria.

V. Self-Punishing Dysphoria

Deep inside,repparttar 126096 narcissist hates himself and doubts his own worth. He deplores his desperate addiction to Narcissistic Supply. He judges his actions and intentions harshly and sadistically. He may be unaware of these dynamics but they are atrepparttar 126097 heart ofrepparttar 126098 narcissistic disorder andrepparttar 126099 reasonrepparttar 126100 narcissist had to resort to narcissism as a defence mechanism inrepparttar 126101 first place.

This inexhaustible well of ill will, self-chastisement, self-doubt, and self-directed aggression yields numerous self-defeating and self-destructive behaviours from reckless driving and substance abuse to suicidal ideation and constant depression.

It isrepparttar 126102 narcissist's ability to confabulate that saves him from himself. His grandiose fantasies remove him from reality and prevent recurrent narcissistic injuries. Many narcissists end up delusional, schizoid, or paranoid. To avoid agonising and gnawing depression, they give up on life itself.



Sam Vaknin ( http://samvak.tripod.com ) is the author of Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited and After the Rain - How the West Lost the East. He served as a columnist for Central Europe Review, PopMatters, and eBookWeb , and Bellaonline, and as a United Press International (UPI) Senior Business Correspondent. He is the the editor of mental health and Central East Europe categories in The Open Directory and Suite101.


Grandiosity Bubbles

Written by Sam Vaknin


Continued from page 1

Allrepparttar mechanisms of pathological narcissism are at work duringrepparttar 126095 bubble phase. The narcissist idealizesrepparttar 126096 situation,repparttar 126097 other "actors", andrepparttar 126098 environment. He tries to control and manipulate his milieu into buttressing his false notions and perceptions. Faced with an inevitable Grandiosity Gap, he becomes disillusioned and bitter and devalues and discardsrepparttar 126099 people, places, and circumstances involved inrepparttar 126100 bubble.

Still, Grandiosity Bubbles are not part ofrepparttar 126101 normal narcissistic mini-cycle (seerepparttar 126102 resources inrepparttar 126103 section titled "Also Read" below). They are rare events, much like trying on a new outfit for size and comfort. They fizzle out rapidly andrepparttar 126104 narcissist reverts to his regular pattern: idealizing new Sources of Supply, devaluing and discarding them, pursuingrepparttar 126105 next victims to be drained.

Actually,repparttar 126106 deflation of a grandiosity bubble is met with relief byrepparttar 126107 narcissist. It does not involve a narcissistic injury. The narcissist viewsrepparttar 126108 bubble as merely an experiment at being someone else for a while. It is a safety valve, allowingrepparttar 126109 narcissist to effectively cope with negative emotions and frustration. Thus cleansed,repparttar 126110 narcissist can go back to doing what he does best projecting a False Self and garnering attention from others.



Sam Vaknin ( http://samvak.tripod.com ) is the author of Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited and After the Rain - How the West Lost the East. He served as a columnist for Central Europe Review, PopMatters, and eBookWeb , and Bellaonline, and as a United Press International (UPI) Senior Business Correspondent. He is the the editor of mental health and Central East Europe categories in The Open Directory and Suite101.


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