Oh My God A Girl!

Written by Debbie Jacobs


Continued from page 1

Fortunately my experience has been that it is not employers and co-workers who are resistant to seeing women in leadership roles. Quality tour and guiding companies know that good judgment, experience and attitude play a greater role in hiring a leader then does gender. Instead it isrepparttar clients,repparttar 131134 men and women who arrive nervous and excited to experience an adventure, whether itís on a rock, inrepparttar 131135 mountains or on a river, who have envisioned a strong, fearless leader who does not have breasts.

I led my first trip for a group of women 20 years ago. Today I organize and lead trips for women over 40. Along with being great fun, these exclusive groups allow womenrepparttar 131136 unique opportunity to see other women in positions of power and control, to witness a group of women working out problems and dealing withrepparttar 131137 host of challenges encountered on a river trip or while traveling abroad.

By supporting each other and being open to seeing women in leadership roles women help each other to succeed and achieve more than they thought possible. As more and more women become visible in outdoor recreation and leadership I suspectrepparttar 131138 day isnít too far off when weíre met withrepparttar 131139 exclamation ďOH GREAT, A WOMAN!Ē As forrepparttar 131140 fellow onrepparttar 131141 canoe trip in New Zealand; I had to rescue him and his canoe after he flipped inrepparttar 131142 first rapid, but it wasnít until I barbecued a perfect medium rare steak that he was truly impressed. Go figure.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Debbie Jacobs, founder and president of Explorations in Travel, http://www.exploretravel.com, organizes outdoor and cultural adventures for women over 40 and arranges individual volunteer placements in Latin America,repparttar 131143 South Pacific and Nepal. She lives in southern Vermont with too many dogs. She can be contacted at explore@sover.net. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copyright 2000-by Debbie Jacobs This article may be reprinted as long as: 1.) It is reprinted in its entirety 2.) The byline remains intact



Debbie Jacobs, founder and president of Explorations in Travel, http://www.exploretravel.com, organizes outdoor and cultural adventures for women over 40 and arranges individual volunteer placements in Latin America, the South Pacific and Nepal. She lives in southern Vermont with too many dogs. She can be contacted at explore@sover.net.


Faces of Mom

Written by Vic Peters


Continued from page 1

As I grow older I notice that my wife has those same looks that my mom does, and it scares me. I thought I had seen every look that there was to be seen, at least once. I have a mother, I have a wife, and for extra torture in my life God saw to it that I have a thirteen-year-old daughter whose face is ALWAYS twisted into some kind of look or another. Of course, I am wrong about knowing all ofrepparttar looks, but Iím ALWAYS wrong, and old and fat and baldójust ask my daughter. Or donít ask her; sheíll tell you anyway.

I know looks better than most folks, and Iím pretty good at calming down tense situations. Iíd even say that I am an expert. If a woman is sad, I can do a little cheering-up magic, or, atrepparttar 131131 very least, just make her mad enough to want to kick me. Face it: Iím blessed. Butrepparttar 131132 problem with being an expert is that sooner or later youíll get humbled.

There is a certain look on a motherís face that a child will never see, and Iím glad for it. I saw it forrepparttar 131133 first timerepparttar 131134 other day at a funeral, and it nearly broke my heart. Children see allrepparttar 131135 looks that a mother has to offer, except oneóthe one they wear when you die before they do.

I could find no words to speak to this woman, nor could my eyes findrepparttar 131136 courage to stay off ofrepparttar 131137 ground. I wasnít alone inrepparttar 131138 shadow of cowardice, which told me that she was. And though there were others who have shared her experience, she would remain alone. Time would healóthatís whatrepparttar 131139 preacher saidóbut nothing would berepparttar 131140 same. Everyone knows that.

As I consider my own fragile relationship with my mother, it is clear to me that this distance will ultimately separate us. Who of us, I wonder, will cross this void first? Never will I holdrepparttar 131141 look thatrepparttar 131142 woman atrepparttar 131143 funeral bore, for I know nothing ofrepparttar 131144 bond a mother feels between herself and her child, only that which a child feels for his mother. Isrepparttar 131145 look that a child carries different from what I have seen? I do not know and do not wish to. Denial lends but weak hands where reality lives, yet softens its bitter edges nonerepparttar 131146 less.

Do I prepare myself for this face to come? Will being prepared enable me to avoid another slide down a wall intorepparttar 131147 black? Perhaps, but I fear that this embrace may take me further intorepparttar 131148 darkness that I hope to avoid.

If I listen to my heart, I know that there is but one path in this life. The path is ofrepparttar 131149 present, where I know my mother to be, and I will walk with her as far asrepparttar 131150 trail leads. Anything else would be a lieóor perhaps a sinóif I did not appreciate what life has given me: my mother.



Vic Peters is the author of Mary's Field, a new Christian novel from Millennial Mind Publishing. More information is available at www.marysfield.com


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