Misdiagnosing Narcissism - Asperger's Disorder

Written by Sam Vaknin


Continued from page 1

Thus, whilerepparttar narcissist avoids pain by excluding, devaluing, and discarding others -repparttar 126344 Asperger's patient achievesrepparttar 126345 same result by withdrawing and by passionately incorporating in his universe only one or two people and one or two subjects of interest. Both narcissists and Asperger's patients are prone to react with depression to perceived slights and injuries - but Asperger's patients are far more at risk of self-harm and suicide.

The use of language is another differentiating factor.

The narcissist is a skilled communicator. He uses language as an instrument to obtain Narcissistic Supply or as a weapon to obliterate his "enemies" and discarded sources with. Cerebral narcissists derive Narcissistic Supply fromrepparttar 126346 consummate use they make of their innate verbosity.

Not sorepparttar 126347 Asperger's patient. He is equally verbose at times (and taciturn on other occasions) but his topics are few and, thus, tediously repetitive. He is unlikely to obey conversational rules and etiquette (for instance, to let others speak in turn). Nor isrepparttar 126348 Asperger's patient able to decipher nonverbal cues and gestures or to monitor his own misbehavior on such occasions. Narcissists are similarly inconsiderate - but only towards those who cannot possibly serve as Sources of Narcissistic Supply.

More about Autism Spectrum Disorders here:

McDowell, Maxson J. (2002) The Image ofrepparttar 126349 Mother's Eye: Autism and Early Narcissistic Injury , Behavioral and Brain Sciences (Submitted)

Benis, Anthony - "Toward Self & Sanity: Onrepparttar 126350 Genetic Origins ofrepparttar 126351 Human Character" - Narcissistic-Perfectionist Personality Type (NP) with special reference to infantile autism

Stringer, Kathi (2003) An Object Relations Approach to Understanding Unusual Behaviors and Disturbances

James Robert Brasic, MD, MPH (2003) Pervasive Developmental Disorder: Asperger Syndrome



Sam Vaknin is the author of Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited and After the Rain - How the West Lost the East. He is a columnist for Central Europe Review, United Press International (UPI) and eBookWeb and the editor of mental health and Central East Europe categories in The Open Directory, Suite101 and searcheurope.com.

Visit Sam's Web site at http://samvak.tripod.com




The Manifold of Sense - Part II

Written by Sam Vaknin


Continued from page 1

The epistemological status of sensations is much less clear. When we see an object, are we aware of a "visual sensation" in addition to being aware ofrepparttar object? Perhaps we are only aware ofrepparttar 126343 sensation, wherefrom we inferrepparttar 126344 existence of an object, or otherwise construct it mentally, indirectly? This is what,repparttar 126345 Representative Theory tries to persuade us,repparttar 126346 brain does upon encounteringrepparttar 126347 visual stimuli emanating from a real, external object. The Naive Realists say that one is only aware ofrepparttar 126348 external object and that it isrepparttar 126349 sensation that we infer. This is a less tenable theory because it fails to explain how do we directly knowrepparttar 126350 character ofrepparttar 126351 pertinent sensation.

What is indisputable is that sensation is either an experience or a faculty of having experiences. Inrepparttar 126352 first case, we have to introducerepparttar 126353 idea of sense data (the objects ofrepparttar 126354 experience) as distinct fromrepparttar 126355 sensation (the experience itself). But isn't this separation artificial at best? Can sense data exist without sensation? Is "sensation" a mere structure ofrepparttar 126356 language, an internal accusative? Is "to have a sensation" equivalent to "to strike a blow" (as some dictionaries of philosophy have it)? Moreover, sensations must be had by subjects. Are sensations objects? Are they properties ofrepparttar 126357 subjects that have them? Must they intrude uponrepparttar 126358 subject's consciousness in order to exist or can they exist inrepparttar 126359 "psychic background" (for instance, whenrepparttar 126360 subject is distracted)? Are they mere representations of real events (is pain a representation of injury)? Are they located? We know of sensations when no external object can be correlated with them or when we deal withrepparttar 126361 obscure,repparttar 126362 diffuse, orrepparttar 126363 general. Some sensations relate to specific instances others to kinds of experiences. So, in theory,repparttar 126364 same sensation can be experienced by several people. It would berepparttar 126365 same KIND of experience though, of course, different instances of it. Finally, there arerepparttar 126366 "oddball" sensations, which are neither entirely bodily nor entirely mental. The sensations of being watched or followed are two examples of sensations with both components clearly intertwined.

(continued)

Sam Vaknin is the author of Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited and After the Rain - How the West Lost the East. He is a columnist for Central Europe Review, United Press International (UPI) and eBookWeb and the editor of mental health and Central East Europe categories in The Open Directory, Suite101 and searcheurope.com.

Visit Sam's Web site at http://samvak.tripod.com




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