Living Virtually: Missing Reality

Written by Dorree Lynn


Continued from page 1

I am a modern woman with a traditionalistís soul. I am old enough to rememberrepparttar sound ofrepparttar 126294 dairy truck as its clinking glass bottles announcedrepparttar 126295 new dayís dairy delivery. I have an even more poignant memory ofrepparttar 126296 day I realized that milk had became homogenized as well as pasteurized. Young as I was, I knew then, that though my children would, hear, taste, feel and experience life in ways as yet unimaginable to me, they would never knowrepparttar 126297 joy of sticking their finger downrepparttar 126298 narrow neck ofrepparttar 126299 glass bottle to tasterepparttar 126300 cream onrepparttar 126301 top when their mother wasnít looking. In fact, they probably would never knowrepparttar 126302 taste of genuine fresh cream.

Life moves on, and I have moved with I; part of a virtual world. I userepparttar 126303 web and I live on e-mail far too much. Yes, writing a book is easier in a document than on a typewriter. And, I know good marriages that started with innocent e-mails. I know that technology is shrinking our world in ways that are more positive than not. Still, I miss Diana and Josh. Our virtual connection allows us to say things we might not ever feel free enough to say in person. E-mail does keep us connected, but deep down, I missrepparttar 126304 easy laughter andrepparttar 126305 touch of both. The essence of each of them is no longer in my life. When I let myself think about that, I missrepparttar 126306 reality of what we used to have.

Life is too hard to do alone,

Dr. D.

Dorree Lynn, PH.D.



Dr. Dorree Lynn is co-founder of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Psychotherapy and a practicing clinician in New York and Washington, DC. Dr. Lynn served on the executive board of the American Academy of Psychotherapists and she is on the editorial board of their publication, Voices. She is also a regular columnist for the Washington, DC newspaper, The Georgetowner. Dr. Lynn is a noted speaker and well known on the lecture circuit.


Coming of Age: Part 1

Written by Dr. Dorree Lynn


Continued from page 1

We are not aging as our parents did, and many of us we are unwilling to simply get old and become useless, to be put out to pasture until we die. The truth is slowly and subtly dawning on our society that life today includes a new age.

There was a time when people who had gone through childhood, adolescence, andrepparttar "productive years" of adulthood came rather abruptly upon old age, or at best what we callrepparttar 126293 senior years. But now, we are discovering a time in-between, truly a new age. Writers, theoreticians, and philosophers are fumbling inrepparttar 126294 dark trying to name this period. Metaphorically speaking, they are underrepparttar 126295 covers, periodically letting their feet hitrepparttar 126296 floor to carry them beyondrepparttar 126297 safety of their past to grope, fumble, and reach towards an understanding of love and sex for a new population inrepparttar 126298 new millennium. A half-century is no longer so very old. A new paradigm is inrepparttar 126299 making and we are re-learning to develop it as we confront our new challenges. As sexuality wanes, sensuality gains. Perhaps, instead of retirement, we will now call it re-firement. Let us learn to live as we are coming to be.

Life is too hard to do alone,

Dr. D.

Dorree Lynn, PH.D.



Dr. Dorree Lynn is co-founder of the Institute for the Advanced Study of Psychotherapy and a practicing clinician in New York and Washington, DC. Dr. Lynn served on the executive board of the American Academy of Psychotherapists and she is on the editorial board of their publication, Voices. She is also a regular columnist for the Washington, DC newspaper, The Georgetowner. Dr. Lynn is a noted speaker and well known on the lecture circuit.


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