Just What Is a Learning Disability, Anyway?

Written by Sandy Gauvin


Continued from page 1

Typically people with learning disabilities work harder than others - but with lesser results. Itís not about hard work - itís a learning disability.

4) A person with a learning disability canít do anything right.

Even though a child may have a learning disability in one or two areas, it doesnít mean they canít do anything right. My daughter struggled with a disability in math, but what a wonderful writer she is! And she has more knowledge about how to get around a computer than many people have. I envy that ability because I think I have a learning disability in that area!

Iíve known students who, even though they struggled with math or reading, were excellent around heavy equipment or automobile engines or carpentry or drafting. Many could do things with a computer that seemed impossible.

The important thing is that, if your child has a learning disability, or even if you suspect he might have one, learn everything you can so that you will know what to expect and what not to expect from him as well as from his teachers and his educational program. That way you will be able to understand and help him inrepparttar best way possible.

While none of us wants to considerrepparttar 109330 fact that our child might have a learning disability, itísrepparttar 109331 intelligent approach to take. When you recognizerepparttar 109332 truth about learning disabilities, youíll know how to maximize your childís abilities and minimize their dis-abilities.

For ways to be an advocate for your child, read "Advocating For Your Child With LD" at www.LDPerspectives.com.

Sandy Gauvin is a retired educator who has seen learning disabilities from many perspectives - as the parent of a daughter with learning disabilities, as the teacher of children with learning disabilities, and as an advocate for others who have diagnosed and unrecognized learning disabilities. Sandy shares her wisdom and her resources at www.LDPerspectives.com


Details, Details, Details

Written by Sandy Gauvin


Continued from page 1

When I get a referral that says, "Johnny cannot read and is not working up to grade level", with no more information than that, I dorepparttar standard battery of tests. Then, when I learn later in conversation with that same teacher that Johnny can't sit still, or Johnny can't attend for anymore than two minutes, or Johnny has missed X number of days of school, or Johnny recently lost an uncle, I realize that perhaps I usedrepparttar 109329 wrong test.

If I had known this information first, I might have given a different test, perhaps one for Attention Deficit Disorder. So I have to go back and do that test afterwards. That information also affects HOW I giverepparttar 109330 test. Perhaps I could have given it in shorter time spans.

My friend had some excellent points. The more specific information you can give,repparttar 109331 better it is forrepparttar 109332 child. Testing is difficult enough on any child, but whenrepparttar 109333 person doingrepparttar 109334 testing doesn't haverepparttar 109335 right information, or not enough information, it can make testing more difficult.

I always found it helpful when teachers would show me asrepparttar 109336 evaluator, any concrete illustrations ofrepparttar 109337 child's problems, such as written work that shows how he spells, or documentation of specific instances of difficulty inrepparttar 109338 classroom, like his trouble with being able to copy information fromrepparttar 109339 board. I realize that teachers have a tremendous work load, but any specific information you can give about that child will helprepparttar 109340 child not just onrepparttar 109341 testing, but inrepparttar 109342 future as well. And, after all, isn't that student's success in life what education's all about?

For more plain talk about learning disabilities, please visit us at www.ldperspectives.com.

Sandy Gauvin is a retired educator who has seen learning disabilities from many perspectives - as the parent of a daughter with learning disabilities, as the teacher of children with learning disabilities, and as an advocate for others who have diagnosed and unrecognized learning disabilities. Sandy shares her wisdom and her resources at www.LDPerspectives.com.


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