Japanese Kanji Learning: Short-Cuts to Rapid Mastery (Part 2)

Written by Stephen Munday


Continued from page 1

The downside is that, unlike Heisig in particular, this method will not allow you to even dream about masteringrepparttar 1,945 joyou kanji: You might breeze through allrepparttar 146403 kanji in this book, but you will still be only just over half-way there. And without Rowley's illustrative skill, you will find it difficult to userepparttar 146404 same method to press on and masterrepparttar 146405 rest.

This is a serious weakness compared torepparttar 146406 other methods mentioned in Part 1. Their advantage is not just that they take you through at least allrepparttar 146407 joyou kanji, but that they also give you a method which you can continue to use for any obscure kanji you come across inrepparttar 146408 future.

So, if you are a visual learner and you are thinking about using Kanji Pict-O-Graphix as your main kanji learning tool, you will probably want to consider whether you are serious enough to want learn more than 1,000 kanji before you get started. However, if you are simply thinking of using this approach as an extra additional resource, there is very little you can say to fault this volume.

Atrepparttar 146409 end ofrepparttar 146410 day, it still comes down to your needs and your preferred learning method: Will you opt for Heisig or Henshall's mnemonics, Rowley's visual approach or will you be a pioneer and create your own unique method? The choice is yours, but grinding, rote kanji memorization does not have to be your fate any more.

Stephen Munday lives in Japan. His most recent project is a website where you can get your name in beautiful Japanese calligraphy. This article is (c) Stephen Munday 2005. Permission is given to reproduce this article in whole with the URLs correctly hyperlinked.


Japanese Kanji Learning: Short-Cuts to Rapid Mastery (Part 1)

Written by Stephen Munday


Continued from page 1

You can download pdf files of substantial sections of each ofrepparttar books in this series for review here:

James Heisig Rememberingrepparttar 146402 Kanji Book 1

http://www.ic.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_1.htm

James Heisig Rememberingrepparttar 146403 Kanji Book 2

http://www.ic.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_2.htm

James Heisig Rememberingrepparttar 146404 Kanji Book 3

http://www.ic.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_3.htm

Kenneth Henshall's A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters

Now, I should first state that, personally, I have not used this method in my own kanji study. However, while looking at ways to accelerate my kanji assimilation ability to joyou level (the 1,945 kanji set taught up torepparttar 146405 end of high school in Japan) and beyond, I came across Henshall's method asrepparttar 146406 other major alternative to traditional repeat-until-you-go-mad methods.

Henshall also employs mnemonics, creating a sentence to plantrepparttar 146407 image ofrepparttar 146408 kanji deep inrepparttar 146409 learner's brain. The difference is that where Heisig takes a fast-and-loose approach withrepparttar 146410 meanings assigned to individual elements of each kanji in reaching his goal of creating a memorable mind-picture, Henshall tracesrepparttar 146411 history of these elements in great scholastic detail.

In my opinion (andrepparttar 146412 reason I personally chose Heisig over Henshall for my own study),repparttar 146413 academic strength of Henshall's analysis is its biggest weakness as a memorization tool: If you have an excellent memory, or if you already knowrepparttar 146414 kanji anyway and are interested in their etymological roots, then Henshall will give you a depth of knowledge that will impress even your native speaker Japanese friends. However, if you do not have an almost-photographic memory, and mastering kanji in a sensible time period is your priority, you will probably find that this detailed and obscure analysis does not providerepparttar 146415 compelling memory "hook" that Heisig's method does.

Other Mnemonic Kanji Study Methods

In addition to these two main players you may also want to consider 2001 Kanji by Father Joseph R. De Roo (although its availability is questionable) or Kanji ABC by Forester and Tamura as alternative approaches.

If you are a visual learner, skip on to Part 2 and discoverrepparttar 146416 methods that can work best with your learning style.

Stephen Munday lives in Japan. His most recent project is a website where you can get your name in beautiful Japanese calligraphy. This article is (c) Stephen Munday 2005. Permission is given to reproduce this article in whole with the URLs correctly hyperlinked.


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