Horticultural Therapy

Written by Thomas Leo Ogren


Continued from page 1

The Fen Shui Garden. The more people you talk to about Fen Shui and gardening,repparttar more opinions on it you get. Ms. Robin Wood, a very talented landscape architect once told me, ďFen Shui gardening is really just good landscape design.Ē And to a point, I would agree with her. In many waysrepparttar 113434 ancient Chinese philosophy of Fen Shui, also called Feng Shui, is all about creating harmony. In a true Fen Shui gardenrepparttar 113435 focus is onrepparttar 113436 atmosphere. A garden is created that encourages meditation, relaxation, close connections to Nature. A good Fen Shui garden does not ignore any of our senses. There are fragrant flowers to smell, wind chimes,repparttar 113437 sounds of water, andrepparttar 113438 songs of birds to please our ears, shade fromrepparttar 113439 hot sun, protection fromrepparttar 113440 wind, places just to sit and think, contrasting surfaces to feel, beauty to please our eye, and perhaps even some fruit or vegetable for our tongue to taste. A true Fen Shui garden is not strictly formal, overly clipped, too tidy and sanitary, all drawn with squares and rectangles. Shrubs donít need to be square nor do all trees need to resemble each other. A quiet restrained informality is encouraged. Love, peace, understanding, and wisdom reign in a true Fen Shui garden. In many ways during all my years atrepparttar 113441 Youth Authority, although I didnít know it atrepparttar 113442 time, I was instinctively trying to develop a Fen Shui garden. Surrounded by guards, gangs, and concertina razor wire, I aspired to create an inner sanctum, a natural place for me and my students to remove ourselves from allrepparttar 113443 bad vibes so very close by. I am not a Fen Shui expert by any means and certainly do not claim to be, but I have read a great deal about it, listened to numerous talks given by so-called experts, and I have long been interested and involved in garden design. I think that Fen Shui does indeed have much to offer and that it is well worth exploring. However, I often notice a certain snobbishness surroundingrepparttar 113444 subject. One expert writes that none ofrepparttar 113445 others know what theyíre talking about, especiallyrepparttar 113446 Western writers and speakers. Iíve met some Fen Shui designers and writers who were cold, impersonal and rude, none of which jives with true Fen Shui in my mind. I sometimes encounter a similar snobbishness with people who refuse to grow any plants not native to their own little local area. My feeling about all these snobby attitudes in gardening is this: Elitism doesnít belong inrepparttar 113447 garden. Plants arenít critical, letís not be that way ourselves. Many people, far wiser than I, have long known thatrepparttar 113448 more we learn about something,repparttar 113449 more we realize how little we know. Harold Young,repparttar 113450 wonderful senior editor of Pacific Coast Nurseryman Magazine once wrote me in an email, ďI used to think I knew a lot of plants.Ē I know just what he means.

Tom Ogren loves fishing, hiking, boxing, baseball, gardening, his family and friends. He is author of 5 published books and hundreds of articles. His website is www.allergyfree-gardening.com


Starting Your Own Fruit Trees

Written by Thomas Leo Ogren


Continued from page 1

Budding Just a little here on budding. In zones 3-8 most budding is done in May,. June or early July. The easiest method is shield budding. A T cut is made onrepparttar rootstock stem, cutting throughrepparttar 113433 outer bark andrepparttar 113434 cambium, down torepparttar 113435 hardwood.. Next you cut a thin, shield-shaped slice of wood (from scion wood ofrepparttar 113436 cultivar you wish to bud), containing one dormant bud. This shield will be about 3/4th of an inch long. This bud is then inserted inrepparttar 113437 T cut underrepparttar 113438 bark ofrepparttar 113439 seedling rootstock. I use thin, clear plastic tie tape to wraprepparttar 113440 bud up tightly. I will sometimes cut a tiny slice inrepparttar 113441 middle ofrepparttar 113442 tape and wraprepparttar 113443 tape overrepparttar 113444 tip ofrepparttar 113445 bud itself, which should just peak out ofrepparttar 113446 sliced portion ofrepparttar 113447 tape. The tape serves to keeprepparttar 113448 bud in close contact withrepparttar 113449 rootstock and also to keeprepparttar 113450 bud graft from drying out. Keep an eye onrepparttar 113451 budded stem for several weeks and by then ifrepparttar 113452 bud andrepparttar 113453 shield are still plump and green, consider it a take. Cut offrepparttar 113454 rest ofrepparttar 113455 stem half an inch aboverepparttar 113456 new bud graft, and this will forcerepparttar 113457 new bud. Budding is not quite as easy to do as grafting, at least not at first. It has several advantages though. You can bud whenrepparttar 113458 weather is nice and ifrepparttar 113459 bud doesnít take, you can try it all over again in a different spot. Budding is easiest on thicker rootstocks. I find that for me I haverepparttar 113460 best luck budding roses, apples, pears and apricots. Plums can be a little trickier. Cherries, byrepparttar 113461 way, are considerably more difficult to graft and bud than arerepparttar 113462 other stone fruits. If you are lucky enough to know an old gardener who knows how to graft, ask him or her to show you how to cut your scions. A little practice always helps as does a sharp knife. There are many books with drawings of cleft grafts and these too can be used as guides. It may sound a tad snobby, but once you can graft your own fruit trees, you join a rather select group. Almost all gardeners know what grafting is, but not that many actually know how to do it right. One last thought: cleft grafting is also easy to do on existing dormant fruit trees. There is no reason you canít graft some different varieties on each of your trees. I have an apple tree with about a dozen kinds of apples on it and a pear tree that has five kinds of pear, plus quince and apple growing on it. I also have almonds growing on one branch of a plum tree, four kinds of plums on another tree, and both plum and nectarine onrepparttar 113463 apricot tree in my front yard. I have five kinds of roses budded onrepparttar 113464 climbing rose that grows on my front porch. I guess my plants are all mixed up, but then, what can you expect from an old guava thief?

Tom Ogren isrepparttar 113465 author of Allergy-Free Gardening, and, Safe Sex inrepparttar 113466 Garden, both by Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, California.



Tom Ogren's newest book, 2004, is, What the Experts May NOT Tell You About: Growing the Perfect Lawn, from Time Warner Books.


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