Five Ways to Get Your Customers to Buy More

Written by Brian Williams


Continued from page 1

Suppose you're an accountant. Most accountants do either compliance or tax work. But why not also offer financial planning services as part ofrepparttar package? What better source to recommend truly worthwhile investments and financial services than an accountant? The deal could be that in addition to handling compliance work even' month, you also recommend, manage, and advise your client's investments all for a set fee (perhaps 50% above what you'd normally charge). It could mean a great increase in profit for you!

3. Use Point-of-Sale Promotions

Point-of-sale promotions are one ofrepparttar 138492 most simple, automatic, instant, and predictable methods for massively increasingrepparttar 138493 total amount of a sale per customer. Let's start with a common example. Think about your local convenience store or supermarket. Atrepparttar 138494 checkout counter you'll find chewing gum, cigarettes, magazines, beef jerky, lottery tickets, single-dose pain reliever packets, and Lord knows what else!

Research shows that up to half of everybody standing atrepparttar 138495 counter will choose one or more of these "impulse items." In some cases, adding these extra items could as much as doublerepparttar 138496 total sale simply because ofrepparttar 138497 impulsiveness of making them available to customers atrepparttar 138498 point of sale. I have made it on http://www.my-mortgage-loans.co.uk

The same is true of signs in windows or on store shelves promoting specials: "Buy two, getrepparttar 138499 third one for half price!" Every time you do that, it motivates a percentage of your customers at that point to purchaserepparttar 138500 item. And that hasrepparttar 138501 effect of increasingrepparttar 138502 average unit of sale.

Ever been in a K-Mart, where they had a Blue light Special? You're inrepparttar 138503 store to buy something specific a piece of clothing, a hardware item, a household item of some sort. And then all of a sudden onrepparttar 138504 loudspeaker they announce an incredible Blue Light Special where you can buy this $50 appliance or tool or game for only $38.

Why do they do that? Because a lot of people who had no intention of buying that product or game or appliance will flock there and buy it. And even though profit is reduced incrementally, it's all found money because they'll sell 100 or 500 or 1,000 of those products in that brief time period many, many more than if it just sat on display at full price!

Think it can't work for service professions? Think again. I have physician clients who put up signs up in their offices, continuously promoting various additional services or products you can get atrepparttar 138505 time of your visit. "Flu shots: $19 today only." Special prices on vitamins. Reduced fees for complete physical examinations or specialized services. I've seen it work elsewhere as well. Health clubs have signs that say, "Free 15-minute facial with every full-hour massage." Guess what happens? A lot of people commit!

4. Offer Good, Better, Best Options

The idea of offering people good, better, and best options has a number of very powerful factors working together to help your customer getrepparttar 138506 best outcome possible. The premise is that there are probably several different gradients of either quality or quantity that you could offer at graduated prices.

You could start with "good," meaningrepparttar 138507 smallest size orrepparttar 138508 basic service. The "better" option might have more bells and whistles, be larger in size, or be somewhat more effective. "Best" would be likerepparttar 138509 Cadillac orrepparttar 138510 Rolls Royce orrepparttar 138511 Mercedes version of your product or service or a premium combination ofrepparttar 138512 other choices. Prices increase according to grade, usually withrepparttar 138513 "best" option representingrepparttar 138514 greatest value forrepparttar 138515 dollar.

A common example ofrepparttar 138516 good, better, best approach is at your local car wash. A basic, run-of-the-mill wash might be $6.00 a good deal. But a dollar more might get you a "Deluxe Car Wash," which includes wax to make your car shine. Finally there'srepparttar 138517 "Supreme Car Wash," which includes wax and undercarriage wash and tire cleaner and chrome cleaner all for $8.00.

Who wants to get a simple wash when all these extras are available for just a couple dollars more? The good, better, best approach works on several levels. First of all, it provides a basic, economical option for those customers who might not have bought anything otherwise. But more importantly, it will likely steer about 30% to 50% ofrepparttar 138518 people who would normally have bought grade one to buy somewhere between grade two and grade three, depending onrepparttar 138519 attributes and price incentives. And that hasrepparttar 138520 effect of tremendously increasingrepparttar 138521 size of your order andrepparttar 138522 amount of profit per transaction!

5. Use Volume Discounts

The final method for increasing your average sale is to offer discounts based on volume. You can secure a lucrative contract, land a big client, or move a ton of inventory simply by offering a special rate for large quantities. Inrepparttar 138523 process, you increase your average customer purchase substantially. The success and profitability of this approach is manifest byrepparttar 138524 numerous warehouse clubs Price Club, Sam's Club, CostCo, etc. Now, if you've ever been in one of them, you know that you end up buying 15 bottles of ketchup, 60 rolls of toilet paper, andrepparttar 138525 giant-sized jar of peanut butter! Do we really think we need it? No! It's just thatrepparttar 138526 price incentive is so appealing we cannot say no! This is a phenomenon that has driven a multi-billion-dollar industry. You should recognize and consider borrowing this proven process for your business wherever possible.

Never Sell Them Less Than They Need!

No matter which approaches you use to boost your average customer purchase, never forget that it is your job no, it is your undying duty, responsibility, and obligation to sell your customer everything he needs to achieve their desired end result. If not, you are doing a grotesque disservice to your customers, and they may not buy from you again.

Remember: You're not selling a product or service, you're selling a desired result. If you truly embrace this philosophy, you won't feel sheepish about selling additional products and services you'll actually feel compelled to make recommendations or to tell your customerrepparttar 138527 whole story. And believe me, they'll richly reward you for it!



Editor, http://www.my-mortgage-loans.co.uk

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Get The Most From Your Pay Per Click Ads

Written by Kevin OHara


Continued from page 1

Next, pull your potential customers with an attention getting title. Itísrepparttar first thingrepparttar 138402 searcher sees. Make sure it matches what your web site offers, if it doesnít some people will not be happy and that's not a good way to start with a potential customer. Try to use your most popular keywords inrepparttar 138403 title. Titles with keywords in them get more click throughs.

Next would be to create a description, but here is where you need to hook them. Make surerepparttar 138404 description builds onrepparttar 138405 title and tells your searcher what they can expect. You donít want to waste money on people who donít meet your ideal customer. You also want to work inrepparttar 138406 keyword they used to find you intorepparttar 138407 description.

A good source for low cost pay per click advertising is www.buzzseek.com Keyword advertising starts as low as .05 a click.

To getrepparttar 138408 most from your pay per click campaign use an attention getting title, a detailed description and choose your keywords wisely. If you follow these guidelines youíre sure to get quality traffic for pennies per keyword.

www.buzzseek.com


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