Energy Aware and Waste Wise

Written by Lillian & Dave Brummet


Continued from page 1
There are many other little things we can do around our home, to save money and reduce waste. Instead of purchasing a plastic drip tray for potted plants, reuse plastic lids from peanut butter or mayonnaise. Often, justrepparttar right size of lid can be found for each potted plant, and most of these are dishwasher safe. Foil food trays also serve this purpose. Plastic containers that fresh herbs are sold in make useful storage packages inrepparttar 105346 kitchen. Dried herbs and vegetables store well in these containers as long asrepparttar 105347 seal is airtight. We once bought some very nice fresh ginger in Vancouverís Chinatown and could not use it all in one recipe. Dave placedrepparttar 105348 peeled and sliced root inrepparttar 105349 herb containers covering it with red wine vinegar. Stored inrepparttar 105350 refrigerator it kept for months this way and made it easy to add fresh tasting ginger to any dish. These are just a few ideas to demonstrate how easy it is to make a difference while saving some money. Imagine how many other small things you can do aroundrepparttar 105351 home or office. Oncerepparttar 105352 ideas have begun to flow, they will cause a ripple effect cascading into other aspects of your life. Then, hopefully, you will think twice before throwing anything intorepparttar 105353 trash.



-- Written by Dave and Lillian Brummet based on the concept of their book, Trash Talk. The book offers useful solutions for the individual to reduce waste and better manage resources. A guide for anyone concerned about their impact on the environment. (http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit)


Reuse in the Workshop

Written by Lillian & Dave Brummet


Continued from page 1

Any clothing or towels too ragged to donate to a thrift store still have value. Cutrepparttar material into squares of different sizes to use as cleanup rags. Many garages, cabinet shops and backyard mechanics will gratefully accept excess rags. Sewing groups would gladly acceptrepparttar 105344 buttons and zippers gleaned fromrepparttar 105345 clothing. Childrenís programs and daycare centers also use buttons for crafts.

Small household appliances that are no longer working can be salvaged for parts. If you are not familiar with this type of operation donít attempt it - you can always donate them to handymen types that you may know, or appliance repair classes in your community. Handles from pots and pans can come in handy for fashioning custom tools, or they can be used to make a storage box easy to carry. Old utensils can be bent and made into various picks and scrapers.

The workshop can become a veritable stew pot of reuse ideas. As it is not a place commonly viewed by guests or neighbors it will not matter so much ifrepparttar 105346 look is compromised byrepparttar 105347 reused items. Of course,repparttar 105348 most important thing isrepparttar 105349 fact that you are reducing your landfill contribution by takingrepparttar 105350 matter into your own hands and making a difference!



-- Written by Dave and Lillian Brummet based on the concept of their book, Trash Talk. The book offers useful solutions for the individual to reduce waste and better manage resources. A guide for anyone concerned about their impact on the environment. (http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit)


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