10 Lessons of the 2002 Winter Olympics

Written by Jim M. Allen


Continued from page 1

7. Speed intorepparttar future, but remember your past.

With every new day,repparttar 125566 future speeds upon us, but not so fast that we can forget those who came before us and pavedrepparttar 125567 way. Jim Shea helped returnrepparttar 125568 sport of skeleton torepparttar 125569 winter Olympics;repparttar 125570 sport last appeared in a winter Olympics back in 1948. Alongrepparttar 125571 way, Shea championed not justrepparttar 125572 sport, butrepparttar 125573 spirit ofrepparttar 125574 Olympics, imparted to him by his father and grandfather, both winter Olympic medal-winners themselves. Sadly, Shea's grandfather died just two weeks before the, but his spirit lives on. --Jimmy Shea, carrying a photo of his grandfather in his helmet, crossedrepparttar 125575 finish line on his final run asrepparttar 125576 gold medal winner.

8. We get by with a little help from our friends.

As if a testament torepparttar 125577 power of standing by one's friends, Jill Bakken and Vonetta Flowers won gold inrepparttar 125578 2-person bobsled competition. Earlier inrepparttar 125579 week, Flowers had been asked by fellow U.S. competitor (and gold medal favorite), Jean Racine, to partner with her, instead of Bakken. Flowers refused.

9. Everyone has a dream.

No matter who was interviewed -- coaches, athletes, family, or observers -- everyone brought with them their own Olympic dream of what could be. Every person has their own dream, whether it's to compete inrepparttar 125580 Olympics or to fly torepparttar 125581 moon. Just as we support our athletes inrepparttar 125582 pursuit of their dreams, let us support each other for our individual dreams as well.

10. We can work it out.

In a world filled with war, terrorism, and territory disputes,repparttar 125583 Olympics showed once more that -- even while nations might not always agree with each other (inside and outsiderepparttar 125584 games) -- they can come together, peacefully, to experiencerepparttar 125585 beauty of sport and competition. It's a start.

Jim Allen is a professional life & business coach. For more ideas, subscribe to his free bi-weekly ezine, THE BIG IDEA, by sending a blank email to: SubscribeGA@CoachJim.com


7 Ways to be a Great Speaker

Written by Jim M. Allen


Continued from page 1

5. Be engaging

Listening to a speech is, for most people, a passive activity. Successful speakers involve their audiences and converse with them so that it's a conversation, not a talking-to.

6. Be positive

No matter whatrepparttar subject, successful speakers are always positive with their audiences. They help their audiences learn what to do as opposed to what NOT to do. They focus onrepparttar 125565 upside, notrepparttar 125566 downside.

7. Be challenging.

Lastly, great speakers always challenge their audiences to do great things. And again, it doesn't matter whatrepparttar 125567 subject. A successful speaker gives yourepparttar 125568 know-how andrepparttar 125569 challenge to make your life more enjoyable and more rewarding everyday.

2001 Jim M. Allen

Jim Allen is a professional life & business coach. For more ideas, subscribe to his free bi-weekly ezine, THE BIG IDEA, by sending a blank email to: SubscribeGA@CoachJim.com


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